Sessions & Speakers

Just Like Me: Vietnam War Stories From All Sides (57 minutes) is a journey from present to past and back again that follows Vietnam veteran Ron Osgood in his quest to recover fragmented and buried stories from all sides of the Vietnam War/American War, revealing multiple perspectives that are thematically interconnected. The stories from veterans and non-combatants look at the ways in which war becomes inscribed into the life histories of ordinary individuals and the attempt to humanize our former enemies.

A Q&A session will take place following the film screening.

Speaker

Ron Osgood is professor emeritus in The Media School, a Vietnam War veteran, and a documentary filmmaker. Since retiring, he continues to teach in the IU Hutton Honors College and produce documentary projects.

Osgood’s recent work, “The Vietnam War/The American War: Stories from All Sides,” includes an oral history website and a documentary film—Just Like Me: Vietnam War Stories From All Sides. This Emmy-winning documentary broadcast on Indiana Public Television, has had screenings at universities and other venues across the country, and was chosen as the closing event for the National Archives “Remembering Vietnam” exhibit in Washington D.C.

Some of Ron’s previous documentary work includes:

  • My Vietnam, Your Iraq—an official selection at eight film festivals, broadcast on PBS in 2011, and available on DVD at PBS Home Video and for streaming through Amazon Prime
  • Climate Change in National Parks
  • Shirts & Skins: The Psychology of Pickup Basketball
  • Emmy-winning Trouble No More: The Making of a John Mellencamp Album

The second edition of Osgood’s textbook, Visual Storytelling: Videography and Post Production in the Digital Age was published in 2013 by Cengage Publishing.

In the digital age, it’s often hard to tell truth from fiction, especially for teenagers. The Poynter Institute for Media Studies—named for IU alumnus Nelson Poynter—has launched a national program to help the next generation of citizens tell the difference. Paul Tash, the chairman of the Poynter Institute and the Tampa Bay Times, will lead a class about this innovative effort. Warning: It may include a pop quiz to test your abilities against those of your grandchildren. There’s no homework, however, and no grades!

Speaker

Paul C. Tash, BA’76, is the chairman and CEO of the Times Publishing Company.

A native of South Bend, Ind., Tash graduated summa cum laude from Indiana University. After receiving the Marshall Scholarship, Tash graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of laws degree from Edinburgh University in 1978.

He started with the Times Publishing Company in the fall of 1978 as a local news reporter and worked his way through various news jobs—including Washington bureau chief—to become the editor of the Tampa Bay Times and CEO of the company.

Tash is chairman of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, a school for journalists and media leaders, which owns Times Publishing. He has served on the boards of America’s leading journalism organizations, including the Associated Press, the Committee to Protect Journalists, and the Pulitzer Prizes, where he was the chairman.

In 2012, Tash received the Distinguished Alumni Service Award from Indiana University; he was inducted into the Indiana Journalism Hall of Fame the following year.

This talk will discuss the rise of singlehood in America, and how widespread use of technology is changing what we thought we knew about human courtship. From online dating to sexting, technology has infiltrated all aspects of our intimate life, with implications for how relationships start and end. Since 2010, Garcia and colleagues have partnered with the online dating company Match.com to conduct Singles in America—the largest annual survey of romantic and sexual attitudes and behaviors of U.S. singles. Garcia discusses how this research on singles expands our understandings of love and sex, and how changing expressions of evolved tendencies for pair-bonding are redefining some aspects of courtship and intimacy.

Speaker

Justin R. Garcia is an evolutionary biologist and sex researcher. He is currently a Ruth N. Halls associate professor of gender studies, an IU Bicentennial professor, and the acting executive director and research director for The Kinsey Institute.

Garcia is an award-winning researcher and educator. His interdisciplinary research program focuses on the evolutionary and biocultural foundations of romantic and sexual relationships across the human life course. Garcia and colleagues have conducted research and published on a variety of topics related to social and sexual behaviors and intimate relationships, including variation in monogamy, intimacy, gender, courtship, dating, desire, satisfaction, and reproductive strategies.

Since 2010, Garcia has served as scientific advisor to Match.com, lending his expertise to the annual Singles in America study—a look at the attitudes and behaviors of single people in the U.S.

This interactive course will explore the human eye from childhood to maturity. Refractive conditions such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, and presbyopia will be discussed. Pathological conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration will be presented, as well as recent developments in refractive and ocular disease management.

Speaker

Susan Kovacich, BA’83, OD’87, completed a hospital-based residency in ocular disease at the John Cochran VA Medical Center in St. Louis. She remained in St. Louis to practice primary care optometry at an HMO before spending four years with a corneal specialist. She joined the IU School of Optometry faculty as a clinical assistant professor in 1998.

Kovacich, currently a clinical associate professor, is a member of several optometric associations and has been published in a number of optometric journals. She also serves on the IU Alumni Association’s executive council.

This session will discuss some of the unique challenges confronting this generation of college students and provide an overview of how the Kelley School of Business is leading the nation in efforts to address mental well-being, destigmatize stress, develop resilience, and teach strategies for sustainable, holistic flourishing. Specific discussion will include a review of Kelley’s innovative programming, staff and faculty engagement, and the allocation of dedicated physical space within Hodge Hall reserved for students to recharge and refocus during difficult days.

Speaker

Joshua E. Perry is the Glaubinger Chair for Undergraduate Leadership and an associate professor of business law and ethics at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business in Bloomington. He also serves as faculty chair of the undergraduate program, where he has administrative responsibilities over the curriculum, admissions, academic advising, student experience, diversity initiatives, study abroad and international programs, social impact initiatives, honors program, the living-learning center, and the career services office for a population of more than 8,000 students.

The co-author of two textbooks and author or co-author of more than 30 published articles, essays, and book chapters, Perry's award-winning scholarship has appeared in a variety of leading law reviews and peer-reviewed journals across the fields of business, medicine, law, and ethics. His research primarily explores legal, ethical, and public policy issues arising out of the commercialization of health care and business of medicine. He also serves as a section editor for the Journal of Business Ethics and a staff editor for the American Business Law Journal. In 2013, he was recognized by the Academy of Legal Studies in Business with their Distinguished Junior Faculty Award.

A recipient of numerous teaching awards and an elected member of IU's Faculty Academy on Excellence in Teaching, Perry teaches courses at the Kelley School on business ethics, critical thinking, and the legal environment of business to undergraduates and MBA students, in both the residential and online programs.

Over the past decade, new surveys of the neighborhood around our home galaxy—the Milky Way—have revealed the presence of dozens of low-mass "dwarf" galaxies that had previously gone undetected. Many of these objects have extreme properties that challenge our picture of how galaxies form and evolve. In this talk, I will explain how my collaborators and I are using data from the Arecibo radio observatory in Puerto Rico and the WIYN optical telescope in Arizona to find new galaxies. Despite being nearby, these objects were invisible until we figured out just how and where to search for them.

Speaker

Katherine Rhode earned a bachelor's degree in physics at Sonoma State University before working as a team member on a number of space telescope missions—first at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center and then at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. She then returned to school to earn a master's degree in astronomy at Wesleyan University and a doctorate in astronomy at Yale University, where she was awarded the Dirk Brouwer Memorial Prize for her dissertation research.

From 2003 to 2006, she was an NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow with a joint appointment at Wesleyan and Yale. Rhode joined the faculty at Indiana University in 2007 and is now an associate professor of astronomy. In 2009, she was awarded an NSF Faculty Early Career Development grant to support her research on the formation of galaxies and their stellar populations. Rhode and her students study the origin and evolution of galaxies with space- and ground-based telescopes, especially the WIYN 3.5-m Observatory, which is partly owned by IU. Rhode currently serves on the WIYN Observatory and the Maria Mitchell Association’s board of directors.

Josh Perry, Glaubinger Chair and Kelley School of Business faculty, will lead a panel discussion featuring Xylem CEO Patrick Decker, BS’87, Dunkin’ CEO David Hoffmann, BS’90, and Idalene Kesner, MBA’82, PhD’83, Kelley School of Business dean.

Hear how each of these Kelley School alumni lead their organizations in the attempt to achieve their brand message, as well as transform and maintain their organizations in turbulent times.

Emcee

Joshua E. Perry is the Glaubinger Chair for Undergraduate Leadership and an associate professor of business law and ethics at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business in Bloomington. He also serves as faculty chair of the undergraduate program, where he has administrative responsibilities over the curriculum, admissions, academic advising, student experience, diversity initiatives, study abroad and international programs, social impact initiatives, honors program, the living-learning center, and the career services office for a population of more than 8,000 students.

The co-author of two textbooks and author or co-author of more than 30 published articles, essays, and book chapters, Perry's award-winning scholarship has appeared in a variety of leading law reviews and peer-reviewed journals across the fields of business, medicine, law, and ethics. His research primarily explores legal, ethical, and public policy issues arising out of the commercialization of health care and business of medicine. He also serves as a section editor for the Journal of Business Ethics and a staff editor for the American Business Law Journal. In 2013, he was recognized by the Academy of Legal Studies in Business with their Distinguished Junior Faculty Award.

A recipient of numerous teaching awards and an elected member of IU's Faculty Academy on Excellence in Teaching, Perry teaches courses at the Kelley School on business ethics, critical thinking, and the legal environment of business to undergraduates and MBA students, in both the residential and online programs.

Panelists

Patrick Decker, BS’87, was named president and CEO of Xylem in March 2014, and he also serves on the Xylem board of directors. Xylem is a leading global water technology provider—serving customers in more than 150 countries with innovative solutions to their most complex water challenges. Under Decker’s leadership, Xylem has completed multiple acquisitions that collectively have expanded the company’s portfolio of smart water infrastructure solutions and advanced data analytics capabilities that are applied in water and critical energy services.

Decker has also overseen an expansion of Xylem Watermark—the company’s corporate citizenship initiative. In addition to continuing its work to provide safe water resources for many of the world’s most vulnerable communities, Watermark now encompasses an ambitious employee volunteerism component that extends to all of Xylem’s nearly 17,000 colleagues. The company pledged to record 100,000 employee volunteer hours in water-related activities over a three-year period in Xylem communities around the globe.

Decker serves on the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Executive Council on Infrastructure, the Infrastructure Committee for the U.S. Business Roundtable, as well as the advisory council for the dean of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University.

David Hoffmann, BS'90, is the CEO of Dunkin’ Brands and president of Dunkin’ U.S.

Hoffmann joined Dunkin’ Brands in October 2016 as president of Dunkin’ U.S.—overseeing all operations, including marketing and development for the brand domestically. He was appointed to CEO in July 2018, where his responsibilities expanded to include Baskin–Robbins, as well as the international businesses of both Dunkin’ and Baskin-Robbins.

Prior to joining Dunkin’ Brands, Hoffmann spent 22 years with McDonald’s Corporation, where he most recently served as president of high growth markets—an area that included China, South Korea, Russia and several additional European markets. From 2009–2015, he held various leadership roles as part of McDonald’s Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa, serving as president beginning in 2012 and overseeing the operations of 8,900 restaurants across 37 countries.

Hoffmann began his career with McDonald’s as a crew member while in high school and later rejoined the company, post-MBA, through its management training program. Prior to rejoining McDonald’s, he worked for Arthur Andersen.

Having lived or worked in more than 40 different markets around the world, Hoffmann has always been passionate about giving back to his local communities. He is actively involved in the Dunkin’ Brands Joy in Childhood Foundation, which partners with children’s hospitals, food banks, and nonprofit organizations across the country to bring joy to kids battling hunger or illness.

Idalene “Idie” Kesner, MBA’82, PhD’83, was appointed dean of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University in July 2013. She is also the Frank P. Popoff Chair of Strategic Management.

Kesner joined the Kelley School faculty in 1995 and has served in many leadership roles, including associate dean of faculty and research, chair of the MBA program, and chair of the Department of Management and Entrepreneurship.

Her research focuses on corporate boards, executive succession, and mergers and acquisitions. In addition to teaching more than 100 executive education classes, she has consulted with many national and international firms on management and board-related issues. She currently serves on four corporate boards and two nonprofit boards.

She has won dozens of teaching awards at the Kelley School and at the University of North Carolina, where she was a professor for 12 years.

When reflecting on her child’s experience with the Active Music Engagement intervention, one parent shared: “He immediately got up and started dancing. It made him forget where he was and what he was doing … he got to kind of step away from the chemo.” Music therapy is an allied health profession that is becoming a standard of care in many pediatric hospitals in the U.S., especially for children receiving cancer treatment. Robb’s research has focused on understanding how active music interventions work to improve health outcomes in pediatric cancer patients and their families. During this session, participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the music therapy profession, as well as an Active Music Engagement intervention that uses interactive music play to reduce the emotional distress experienced by young children with cancer and their parents during treatment. Excerpts from parent interviews and session video clips bring research findings to life and help explain how Active Music Engagement interventions work to counteract stressful qualities of cancer treatment and support family relationships.

Speaker

Sheri L. Robb is a board-certified music therapist and professor in the IU School of Nursing with international recognition for her expertise in pediatric music therapy and behavioral intervention research. She currently serves as director for the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute’s KL2 Young Investigators Program and recently completed an eight-year term as the editor-in-chief for the Journal of Music Therapy. Robb’s program of research focuses on development and testing of music therapy interventions to manage distress and improve positive health outcomes in children and adolescents with cancer and their parents. Her work has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, and in 2017 she served as a plenary speaker and panelist for the NIH/Kennedy Center-sponsored workshop focused on advancing music and health research.

Rivers are the arteries of continents. These arteries transport sediment and water from mountains across incredible distances, to the shorelines and ocean deep. To accomplish this task, rivers move across their floodplains and organize themselves into predictable shapes and behaviors. These shapes and behaviors have important implications for how rivers affect humans, and for the environmental services they provide.

In this lecture, we will explore how rivers move as they transport water and sediment over continents. This movement takes place on a small scale, such as the movement of riverbanks, and on a large-scale, as in the wholesale relocation of a river channel. To witness how rivers move, we will use state-of-the-art modeling and remote sensing tools, along with imagery from Google Earth.

Speaker

Douglas Edmonds holds the Malcolm and Sylvia Boyce Chair in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Indiana University. He received his doctorate from Penn State University in 2009 and trained as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Minnesota. He was an assistant professor at Boston College from 2010–2012 before coming to IU. In 2014, he was elected as an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow for his contributions to ocean sciences and the dynamics of deltas. In 2016, he won the IU Trustees Teaching Award for his commitment to teach across all levels of the curriculum.

Edmonds has published more than 50 papers, and his work has been featured on the covers of leading journals, such as Geology and Nature Geoscience. Edmonds is a geologist by training, and his research focuses on understanding the processes that construct modern depositional environments, and then using those processes to make novel interpretations of rocks in the geologic record. He is an active member and contributor to the Community Dynamic Surface Modeling System, which is an NSF-funded, community-wide mathematical modeling initiative. He is also involved with the National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics, which is an NSF-funded initiative to further our ability to predict surficial dynamics.

What should students know and be able to do upon graduation from college? How do faculty members and other stakeholders design and deliver instruction and other interventions to facilitate student learning and success? What strategies are American colleges and universities undertaking to maximize their effectiveness?

This session answers these questions by providing an overview of enduring principles and emerging opportunities for assessing and improving quality in higher education. We will describe the topic, explain its significance, outline the approaches being pursued on college campuses, and share trends contributing to quality assurance in the higher education ecosystem. Join us for an informative and interactive discussion about a topic of importance to all who are stakeholders in and beneficiaries of a college education.

Speaker

Stephen P. Hundley is professor of Organizational Leadership and Senior Advisor to the Chancellor for Planning and Institutional Improvement at IUPUI.  He provides strategic advice and consultation to IUPUI’s chancellor on a range of matters pertaining to campus strategy, effectiveness, and future directions; leads the Office of Planning and Institutional Improvement; directs campus-level strategic planning activities; handles the executive search and leadership onboarding function for the campus; and promotes various improvement-oriented initiatives at IUPUI.

Hundley chairs the Assessment Institute in Indianapolis—the nation’s oldest and largest event focused exclusively on assessing and improving quality in higher education. This annual conference routinely attracts more than 1,000 participants from all 50 states and several foreign countries. He also serves as executive editor of Assessment Update—a bimonthly publication from Wiley/Jossey-Bass with a national readership. With his IUPUI colleague Susan Kahn, Stephen co-edited the recently-released book entitled Trends in Assessment: Ideas, Opportunities, and Issues for Higher Education (Stylus Publishing, October 2019).

Hundley has addressed a variety of audiences in the U.S. as well as more than 30 countries. He has been recognized for his accomplishments through teaching, publication, and service awards. To support his work, Hundley has received competitive funding from federal agencies, state agencies, and private foundations. Hundley has been a faculty member at IUPUI for over 20 years.

Did you know that China’s constitution guarantees the freedom of religion? Or that there are more than 30 million Christians and nearly as many Muslims? How Chinese is Buddhism? Is Confucianism a religion? This class will address these questions and many more as we explore the five things everyone should know about Chinese religions. No previous knowledge of Chinese religion (or history) required.

Speaker

Michael D.K. Ing has been a professor in IU's Department of Religious Studies since graduating from Harvard University in 2011. He studies religious accounts of the human condition, focusing on early Chinese thought. In 2012 he published The Dysfunction of Ritual in Early Confucianism with Oxford University Press, and in 2017 he published The Vulnerability of Integrity in Early Confucian Thought. He is currently working on a translation of an early Chinese text about ritual and politics, as well as a book about grief and resilience in the work of Tao Yuanming—a fifth-century Chinese poet.

Charlie Nelms had audaciously big dreams. Growing up black in the Deep South in the 1950s and 1960s, working in cotton fields, and living in poverty, Nelms dared to dream that he could do more with his life than work for white plantation-owners sunup to sundown. Inspired by his parents, who first dared to dream that they could own their own land and have the right to vote, Nelms chose education as his weapon of choice for fighting racism and inequality.

With hard work, determination, and the critical assistance of mentors who counseled him along the way, he found his way from the cotton fields of Arkansas to university leadership roles. Becoming the youngest and the first African American chancellor of a predominately white institution in Indiana, he faced tectonic changes in higher education during those ensuing decades of globalization, growing economic disparity, and political divisiveness. From Cotton Fields to University Leadership is an uplifting story about the power of education, the impact of community and mentorship, and the importance of dreaming big.

Speaker

Charlie Nelms, MS’71, EdD’77, LHD’19, is a nationally recognized leader in higher education, a compelling storyteller, and a dedicated activist. One of 11 children born to subsistence farmers in the Arkansas Delta, Nelms experienced firsthand the pain of poverty and the sting of racism and legalized segregation: American-style apartheid. He did not merely read about “colored only” waiting rooms, water fountains, and restrooms—he used them.

Nelms obtained his undergraduate degree from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff—a historically black college and university. Nelms is the first African American to be appointed chancellor of an IU campus and vice president of the university. He has also received the President’s Medal for Excellence, the Distinguished Alumni Service Award, and the Thomas Hart Benton Mural Medallion for Distinguished Achievement. Nelms is professor emeritus at IU.

Nelms’ eminent career includes serving as chancellor at Indiana University East, the University of Michigan-Flint, and North Carolina Central University. In 2012, President Obama honored him with the MLK Drum Major for Service Award for helping to address the most pressing needs in our nation.

Nelms is the author of Having My Say: Reflections of a Black Baby Boomer and Start Where You Find Yourself. His memoir, From Cotton Fields to University Leadership: All Eyes on Charlie (IU Press, 2019) will be featured during IU’s Bicentennial celebrations. All proceeds will be donated to UNCF and TMCF for HBCU scholarships.